Interpretation of "The fear of blood

Have you seen Harry's daughter anywhere? Short, dark hair?

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
XiaoAngel
Just Passing Through
Posts: 23
Joined: 12 Jan 2007

Post by XiaoAngel »

I have to say that I agree with everyone that everyone has already said but I would like to add my two cents to this thread as well, with my own personal viewpoint on it.

My immediate thought when faced with that line was this. Someone touched on this earlier with the 'blood relative' thing. The main deity of the cult, the God, is the Holy Mother, or sometimes just the Mother. A bloodline starts from her - Alessa, Cheryl and Heather. As a result, Alessa, Cheryl and Heather are the flesh of the bloodline.

The fear of blood tends to create fear for the flesh - the fear of the Mother creates fear for her children. I think it describes the nightmarish world of Silent Hill and the cult very well indeed.
[img]http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d4/serenarian/jamessigdotcom.png[/img]
I am...if you want me to be.
JENKIJOE10605
Just Passing Through
Posts: 42
Joined: 21 Jan 2007

Post by JENKIJOE10605 »

The fear of being hurt leads to fearing of other people
User avatar
Arthemesic
Historical Society Historian
Posts: 1868
Joined: 11 Jun 2005
Gender: Male
Location: Finland

Post by Arthemesic »

It might be just a catchy phrase to get people interested.
Victory Of The Soul, Triumph Over Ordeal
User avatar
Spong
Gravedigger
Posts: 520
Joined: 16 Apr 2005
Location: Just leaving Existence...

Post by Spong »

Lifetolifeless wrote:Once again, if there's anything important about the phrase, any basis for understanding, it's the contrast between its two prepositions. Sure, the fear of pain leads to fear of those things or agents capable of causing it. Of course, but there's nothing profound about that statement: it's almost redundant, and it doesn't represent a relationship parallel to the one outlined by the phrase in question. The actual phrase says fear for the flesh, not of. To fear for something means that you're concerned about its well-being. Something posing an imminent threat of pain or injury doesn't exactly cause one to suddenly become concerned for its well-being.
People seem to be ignoring what Lifetolifeless is saying.

I have no real thoughts on what "The fear of blood tends to create fear for the flesh" actually means. But any interpretation must surely base itself around the prepositions. I feel the sentence as a whole is largely irrelevant, it's more down to working out what the hell KCET are implying by their use of the words "Blood" and "Flesh".

I agree with Lifetolifeless. The words "fear for" CANNOT mean anything but "a concern for the well-being of".
And then there's the intriguing use of the words "tends to".

The fear of blood usually creates fear for the flesh.
The fear of blood more often than not leads to fear for the flesh.
The fear of blood can lead to fear for the flesh.

All of the above imply that the one thing leading to the other ISN'T definite. So, whatever "blood" is, a fear of it can bring on a concern for the well-being of "flesh". But not always.

Like I said, I have no interpretation of my own - I just wanted to throw a little observation into the mix.

However, I do feel I want to debunk the only interpretation that keeps popping up (the Death/Life theory). Saying that Blood = Death and Flesh = Life doesn't make any sense to me. Why would a fear of death create a fear of (or limit a persons zest for) life/living? Surely, fearing death would invigorate ones appetite for life/living? That particular interpretation's so narrow-margined in the sense that it's entirely a matter of perspective, isn't it?
Last edited by Spong on 11 Jul 2007, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Adrasteia
Brookhaven Receptionist
Posts: 871
Joined: 25 Apr 2006
Gender: Female
Location: Seattle, WA

Post by Adrasteia »

I don't think they're saying that a fear OF life/living develops. It's that the fear FOR life/living does. One becomes protective of their life and health, guarding oneself out of fear.
Anonymous

Post by Anonymous »

I know it was mentioned before, but what's the translation of this in the original Japanese game? I think we should look into that and then draw any conclusions.
User avatar
Spong
Gravedigger
Posts: 520
Joined: 16 Apr 2005
Location: Just leaving Existence...

Post by Spong »

Ian wrote:I know it was mentioned before, but what's the translation of this in the original Japanese game? I think we should look into that and then draw any conclusions.
The Japanese game has the english line at the start as well. As far as I know.
User avatar
Watchdog
Historical Society Historian
Posts: 2647
Joined: 22 May 2006
Gender: Male
Location: Bristol

Post by Watchdog »

Isn't it something along the lines of "A fear of death causes fear of living"?
Image
valiturus

Post by valiturus »

THE FEAR FOR BLOOD TENDS TO CREATE THE FEAR FOR FLESH.

My interpretation is this: Blood represents death; the spilling of. Flesh represents life; live skin. So my concluding interpretation is that it's saying that if someone fears death so much that they will create a fear to really <i> live </i>.
Salem
Just Passing Through
Posts: 80
Joined: 24 Dec 2005
Location: In a country founded by Puritans... I'm doomed.

Post by Salem »

Personally I think some people are reading to much into this. It seems a pretty straight forward phrase to me. If one is afraid of blood then they will start to fear the cause of blood flow a.k.a. harming the flesh. To put it another way, fearing blood tends to create a fear of getting hurt.

As for blood= death... well I can't understand that one at all. If anything, it's lack of blood= death.
"Salem, you are wrong. You are wrong because you are seeing it from a different point of view."- Someone on another forum.

But yeah... that pretty much sums me up.
Satoris
Just Passing Through
Posts: 47
Joined: 04 Sep 2007

Post by Satoris »

Personally, I think it's just a bad translation from the Japanese.
deez
Just Passing Through
Posts: 76
Joined: 13 Jun 2007

Post by deez »

"The fear of blood tends to create fear for the flesh", i think means that the fear of blood tends to create fear for the flesh 8)
User avatar
jason_the_one
Just Passing Through
Posts: 65
Joined: 21 Mar 2006
Location: hartlepool, town of sin.

Post by jason_the_one »

deez wrote:"The fear of blood tends to create fear for the flesh", i think means that the fear of blood tends to create fear for the flesh 8)
EXACTLY!.........wait.....

we are shown alessas picture when we see the sentence. it means alessa is afraid of being hurt, the very heart of sh1's story.
they look like monsters to you?
User avatar
Suzie-too
Just Passing Through
Posts: 51
Joined: 13 Sep 2007
Location: The Origin of Symmetry

Post by Suzie-too »

There is nothing real deep going on here... if you are afraid of blood, you fear for your own flesh, lest you bleed yourself. ie, They are afraid of injuring themselves.

Look at people who freak out and faint at the sight of other peoples blood, just imagine if they began bleeding themselves...

voila! "The fear of blood tends to create fear for the flesh"
User avatar
jason_the_one
Just Passing Through
Posts: 65
Joined: 21 Mar 2006
Location: hartlepool, town of sin.

Post by jason_the_one »

i think fanny
they look like monsters to you?
deez
Just Passing Through
Posts: 76
Joined: 13 Jun 2007

Post by deez »

I always just thought it was a way to set the mood.
User avatar
Xigz
Hope House Careworker
Posts: 673
Joined: 20 Jun 2006
Location: Minnesota

Post by Xigz »

I always thought it was pretty lame an shallow. An overrated saying.

Though I like Adversary's thinking.
[b]I'm constant now, and useful too.
I know my eyes cannot see through.[/b]
User avatar
King Crimson
Brookhaven Receptionist
Posts: 959
Joined: 30 May 2007
Location: a dead cloverfeild...

Post by King Crimson »

lame an shallow. An overrated saying.
I dont understand, how is it overrated and shallow?
Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only try to realize the truth. There is no spoon.
User avatar
LastGunslinger
Woodside Apartments Janitor
Posts: 1099
Joined: 15 Aug 2003
Gender: Male
Location: The most extreme and utter region of the human mind.
Contact:

Post by LastGunslinger »

The first thought that always popped into my head was that "fear of blood" referred to fear of family.

Beyond all of the cult stuff, the game can be taken as a journey through the mind of an abused child. Alessa obviously fears Dahlia; while we are shown in the game that Alessa once wanted a normal relationship with her mother, through the course of her torment she began to fear for herself and acted out against her.
“The sinister, the terrible never deceive: the state in which they leave us is always one of enlightenment. And only this condition of vicious insight allows us a full grasp of the world, all things considered, just as a frigid melancholy grants us full possession of ourselves. We may hide from horror only in the heart of horror."
--Thomas Ligotti
User avatar
phantomess
SHH Cult & SHHF Moderator
SHH Cult & SHHF Moderator
Posts: 4776
Joined: 03 Jan 2005
Gender: Female
Location: California
Contact:

Post by phantomess »

LastGunslinger wrote:The first thought that always popped into my head was that "fear of blood" referred to fear of family.
Wow, that's an interesting new thought. I'm not so sure about it, but really, kudos.
Hunting the abyss lord . . . Only one will stay alive!
Image
Post Reply